devos from the hill

Leave a comment

3 Steps to Experiencing God’s Love More Fully and Consistently – Part 1 / Step 1

by Fred Carpenter

Step 1 – Be Dissatisfied with your Present Experience & Believe it is Possible to Experience More.

 A.  Are you thirsty for God’s love?

i.  In his sermon, “Heaven Is a World of Love,” Jonathan Edwards described God’s love in this way, “The Apostle tells us that God is love, 1 John 4:8. And therefore seeing he is an infinite Being, it follows that he is an infinite fountain of love. Seeing he is an all-sufficient Being, it follows that he is a full and overflowing and an inexhaustible fountain of love. Seeing he is an unchangeable and eternal Being, he is an unchangeable and eternal source of love….There in heaven, this fountain of love, this eternal three in one, is set open without any obstacle to hinder access to it. There this glorious God is manifested and shines forth in full glory, in beams of love; there the fountain overflows in streams and rivers of love and delight, enough for all to drink at and to swim in, yea, so as to overflow the world as it were with a deluge of love. (The Sermons of Jonathan Edwards, 245)

Romans 5:5 tells us that God’s love has been “poured into our hearts.”  The Weymouth translation of the New Testament reads, “God’s love for us floods our hearts.” Continue reading



Today’s Devotional is from Ray Stedman
Read the Scripture: John 4:1-42

Jesus answered, Everyone who drinks this water will be thirsty again, but whoever drinks the water I give them will never thirst. Indeed, the water I give them will become in them a spring of water welling up to eternal life. (John 4:13-14)

Earlier in this chapter, Jesus is met at Jacob’s well by a Samaritan woman, who has come to draw water. How very beautifully Jesus overleaps the various barriers that separated him from this woman. He was a rabbi, and according to the rabbinical law, rabbis were instructed to never talk to a woman in public—not even to their own wives or sisters. In fact, the rabbinical law said, It is better to burn the law than to give it to a woman. In that culture, women were regarded as totally unable to understand complicated subjects like theology and religion.

But notice how Jesus treats her. He could judge something about her from the circumstances of her being at this well. Although there was another well in the village, as a moral outcast she was forced to come all the way out to this well, half a mile away. Meeting her, our Lord understood this to be a sign from his Father that here was one of those sinners whom he came to call to repentance. He himself said on one occasion, I did not come to call the righteous to repentance but sinners (Mt 9:13). He probably knew more about this woman’s history than this introduction suggests, because later he tells her some facts about herself that he evidently knew. He had been through this small village several times and had probably heard something about her. Now to have her meet him at the well is to him an indication that God the Father wanted to reach out to her. Continue reading